0
☰ Menu hexagon
×

Recommended Products & Resources

Just a Few of our Favorite Things!

hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon

hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon hexagon

Feeding Chairs & Postural Stability

Stokke Trip Trapp Chair

-Durable, easy to wipe, and adjusts to fit toddlers to adults
- Highly adjustable for ideal postural support at the table
- 240 pound weight limit
- Larger foot rest, so it supports kids longer than some other adjustable wooden chairs
- Comes in lots of fun colors!
- Easy to add in side supports using yoga blocks if needed
- Buy it on the Stokke Website or from Nordstrom, Buy Buy Baby, Stroller Depot, or Bed Bath and Beyond

Stokke Website

Keekaroo Height Right Chair

- Durable, easy to wipe, and adjusts to fit toddlers to adults
- Highly adjustable for younger children, but foot rest is shorter than some other adjustable wooden chairs
- 250 pound weight limit
- 5 year warranty
- Easy to add side supports using yoga blocks if needed
- Buy it on the Keekaroo website or from Amazon, Walmart, Target, or Buy Buy Baby

Keekaroo Website

Badger Basket Embassy

- Comes with high chair tray to support baby from the time they can sit unassisted
- Has more side support than other adjustable wooden chair options, but a relatively smaller foot rest
- 175 pound weight limit
- 30 day limited warranty
- Buy it on the Badger Basket website, or from Target or Amazon.

Badger Basket Website

Yoga Blocks

Yoga Blocks make great, easy-to-clean side supports for your child who needs a little extra support in an adjustable wooden chair. If needed, you can even use clear packing tape to secure them to the chair so they don't become a distraction to your child during meals

Find it on Amazon

Graco Swivi Seat 3-in-1 Booster High Chair

- Great first feeding chair, as it is able to recline, then sit upright
I- ncludes additional side supports for your young infant
- Chair adjusts to grow with your toddler
- Can be used with the tray or pushed up against the table
- Can be attached to your existing chair, or can go on top of an adjustable wooden chair

Find it on Amazon

Chicco Polly Progress High Chair

- Great first feeding chair, as it is able to recline, then sit upright
- Chair adjusts to grow with your toddler
- Folds for easy storage between meals (if desired)
- Infant chair can be taken off of the base when it is time to bring baby to the table.
- Can adjust to be a booster or a stool configuration, however, neither of these options provides sufficient foot support, and the stool configuration does not provide sufficient back or side support.

Find it on Amazon

Utensils

ChooMee Starter Spoon

These are another great starter spoon, as they hold just a taste of the puree. These are also great for older kids who are learning about purees.

Find them on Amazon

Stainless Steel Utensils

These are great for kids who are just starting out with utensils as well as older kids who need some additional help. The small size of the spoons are great for helping kids use a smaller volume (to help with overstuffing and/or if they are feeling a little nervous about a new taste), and the forks are thin enough that it allows the child to place the food directly on their molars.

Find them on Amazon

Kindertools

These utensils are great for kids who have trouble moving their wrist to scoop or poke food, then get it into their mouth. This company also makes other tools to hold paint brushes or crayons and a toothbrush with the same handle.

Find them online

Beginner Cups

Rubbermaid Juice Box

This is a great cup for introducing straws, as it allows you to gently squeeze the bottle to bring the liquid right to the tip of the straw so the child doesn’t have to do as much work to get the liquid out.

Find it on Amazon

First Years Sippy Cup

We like the Take and Toss Sippy cups because they do not have a valve in them, so they do not perpetuate the skills needed for bottle drinking like some other cups. Additionally, some packs come with removable handles which make them a little easier to hold. Sippy cups (without no-spill valves) are a nice stepping stone on the way to open cup drinking, as it decreases the postural and motor demands of drinking from a cup (not tipping it too much or too little and spilling).

Find it on Amazon

Plastic Mini Cups or Shot Glasses

Most open cups are sized for big kids and adults and can be tough for young children to manage – the equivalent of you drinking your morning coffee out of a soup bowl. Tiny cups or shot glasses make a great first open cup for young children. You can put a tiny amount of water or other liquid in the cup, then model holding it with two hands, putting on top of your bottom lip, and tipping it up to take a drink. Additionally, you can find them in all sorts of materials to work best for your child – we like these thick plastic ones, as the paper or single-use plastic cups you would use in a bathroom are often crushed by kids with force gradation problems.

Find it on Amazon

Kitchen Tools

Kids' Kitchen Knife

- Great way to get kids to help in the kitchen safely
- Many kids are willing to help cut a food even if they aren’t ready to touch it with their fingers yet (your child may need you to help hold the food stable for them)
- These knives cut better than regular plastic utensils, but tend to cut/pinch skin less often.
*Close adult supervision is required

Find them on Amazon

Mini Food Choppers

- Great for experimenting with different foods
- Nice way to add some proprioceptive input to your food play
- Great for kids who aren’t ready to touch the food with their hands yet

The mini chopper is preferred, especially for younger children.

Find one on Amazon

Appetizer/Cocktail Forks

- A fun utensil to help children put food on their side teeth
- "Kid-sized" which can help if they are having difficulty with large adult-sized forks
- You can usually find different versions of these in your local grocery store near the paper plates and napkins.
*Close adult supervision is required because pieces may come off of the plastic cocktail forks if you bite too hard and the metal cocktail forks may be sharp

Find some on Amazon

Kids' Books

Applesauce Grows on Trees

This fun book shares a story about a boy who only eats 3 foods and his experience at Food School, where he learns that learning about new foods is FUN! This book is great for kids who can sit for a little bit of a longer story

Find it on Amazon

Strawbert's Sensational Story

This book tells a fun and interactive story that shows children eating doesn't have to be scary, but rather an exciting multiple-step adventure, exploring and building a positive relationship with food. This book was written by a therapist who uses the SOS Approach to Feeding program. This book is great for school aged kids.

Find it on Amazon

Ovis Has Trouble with Eating

Ovis is a sheep that is misunderstood by his family and his friends. He has sensory processing issues, therefore he doesn't eat. But when Ovis gets some new ideas about how to cope from an occupational therapist, he gets back on track. This series also includes Ovis Has Trouble at School.

Find it on Amazon

My Tubey Series

The My Tubie Series is great for kids with g-tubes. We have sent these books to school to help explain a child's g-tube to their classmates. The series include:
- There's More than One Way to Eat
- A Day in the Life of a Tube Fed Girl
- A Day in the Life of a Tube Fed Boy
- My Tubey Goes to School

Find them on Amazon

Parent Support

Feeding Matters

Feeding Matters is the first organization in the world uniting families, healthcare professionals, and the broader community to improve the system of care for children with pediatric feeding disorder through advocacy, education, support, and research. If you need support, these wonderful moms will personally call you.

Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation

This website has tons of great information about g-tubes. It includes basic information about g-tubes, logistics of using a g-tube, troubleshooting common problems, as well as resources.

 

Parentline Colorado

Parentline Colorado is a free telebehavioral health service offering brief, strategic psychotherapy through video chat and telephone to pregnant and postpartum families with children up to age five. This program is being piloted by the Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Specialty at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology.

Other Resources to Help Your Child Learn about Foods

Kids Cook Real Food

Kids Cook Real Food has excellent resources for helping your child learn to cook and help with meal preparation. Helping cook allows kids the opportunity to look at, touch, and smell the foods as it is being prepared, and gets them on the Steps to Eating Hierarchy! There is also a free video teaching beginner knife skills that you can watch with your child.

 

Raddish

Raddish is a subscription program that sends new cooking ideas straight to your door. Membership includes a monthly cooking kit, digital bonus recipes and activities, and access to an online community. There are new themes each month, and they never repeat providing you and your family with lots of great, fun recipes to try. With each kit, kids learn culinary skills, create new recipes, collect an apron patch and kitchen tool, and gain valuable experience learning about a wide variety of foods as they cook! Best of all, your child can benefit just from helping with the cooking process, even if they aren’t ready to eat the final product yet.

 

Food Activities for Children: No Heat, Meat, or Fancy Kitchen Gadgets Required

This book is a great resource for helping get a child involved in the kitchen. Cooking is a fantastic way to help a child learn about a variety of new foods, especially for kids who have trouble being around new or non-preferred foods. Moving the food work away from the table can help take off some of the pressure to taste/eat that new food, allowing many children to be much more successful.

 

Copyright SOS Approach to Feeding © 2020 | Web Design by Webolutions